Electrical gauges

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Electrical gauges

Postby Tortron » 05 Sep 2005, 07:53

so i err "found" some gauges - oil pressure and temperature.

their both electrical, whats the deal with an electrical oil pressure gauge? hows that work
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Postby iety2004 » 05 Sep 2005, 08:46

I belive you use a t-piece where the oil pressure switch is and just use and electrical sender and run a wire to the gauge, seems less complicated than an mechanical gauge.
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Postby Herbie_Flowers » 05 Sep 2005, 10:40

iety2004 wrote:seems less complicated than an mechanical gauge.

it doesn't get any easier than a poxy piece of nylon pipe mate :P
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Postby iety2004 » 05 Sep 2005, 12:54

i supose, im not sure about running oil in to the car for the gauge.
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Postby Herbie_Flowers » 05 Sep 2005, 13:51

nothing went wrong, leakage wise, with my old mk1 escort and plenty of other vehicles with capillary tubes.
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Postby Harry Flatters » 05 Sep 2005, 18:11

Electrical oil pressure gauge uses a variable resistor attached to the oil pressure sender diaphragm. If I remember right the Kadett / Manta ones have the sender and switch both in the same unit. I always found them to be unreliable - capillary ones are simple, reliable, and accurate - just make sure the pipe's routed where it won't kink or chafe & it'll be OK.
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Postby hsr2.6 » 05 Sep 2005, 19:55

i've always used the capillery type with no hassle what so ever
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