C20LET instead of XE

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C20LET instead of XE

Postby Nostrebor777 » 01 Feb 2007, 19:13

Is there any reason no one has used the C20LET in place of the XE? its not that different is it?

I have a brain child and it wants to be born!!!!! :D :D :D
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Postby Shoveitpusher » 02 Feb 2007, 09:05

if that's the regular ecotec then it is different in terms of power, the xe has a huge potential and is well known. outputs in the 300bhp area are achievable off the shelf.

in reality there is no reason i have heard of, it should do more than adequate power without any mucking about
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Postby andy » 02 Feb 2007, 09:10

no the c20let is the turbo engine from the calibra or cav pretty much identical to the xe but has a turbo and produces 204 bhp standard and a few other minor differences.

Its definitely possible i have seen a few LET kadetts te only reason im sticking to an xe is cos of the momney really and once i have it up and running with an xe in i can easily change it for a let at a later date when funds allow.

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Postby Raver » 02 Feb 2007, 13:39

Im planning to go the xe route on carbs once mines running and then the Turbo, didnt fancy dropping it straight in tho as the car is stripped and had images of it coming on boost and fishtailing into something.
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Postby rodgerq » 02 Feb 2007, 23:27

aye it'll fit on the same mounts etc. might want to think about what box you put on and it'll need a decent future proof prop - future proof in that you will no doubt want to tune it. and that can be done with relative ease and low cost.

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Postby Nostrebor777 » 04 Feb 2007, 00:26

good good, I probably wont do it due the engines being so expensive but if I cud find a decent insuarance write off calibra or cavalier I might consider it.

how have people with turboed lumps overcome the problem of not having power assited brakes? im guessing the common route is to do away with the servo or use a vacum pump or exhauster from a the same turboed engine or similar?

cheers guys,

dave
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Postby Gordo » 04 Feb 2007, 00:45

Nostrebor777 wrote:good good, I probably wont do it due the engines being so expensive but if I cud find a decent insuarance write off calibra or cavalier I might consider it.

how have people with turboed lumps overcome the problem of not having power assited brakes? im guessing the common route is to do away with the servo or use a vacum pump or exhauster from a the same turboed engine or similar?

cheers guys,

dave

Still got vacuum when they're not boosting/at full throttle. Just as with a NA engine, part throttle will have a depression (partial vacuum) in the manifold.
You may be thinking of the diesel engine - it runs at "full throttle" all the time - power is varied by altering the amount of fuel injected into the combustion chamber.
ttfn

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Postby CancerWagon » 04 Feb 2007, 00:46

A vacuum pump is how most diesels do it (as there is no throttle). The stink juice powered chevettes have a vac pump attached to the back of the delco alternator... have yet to remove and get a close look at the one I have.

Electric units are readily available for people doing EV conversions, not sure as to price though.
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Postby Nostrebor777 » 04 Feb 2007, 01:47

orit, i was always told that all forced induction engines, diesel or petrol, used a vacum pump :( but that makes more sense.

cheers for that, much appreciated

dave
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Postby rodgerq » 04 Feb 2007, 01:51

difference between a deisel and petrol is that deisel engines dont have a throttle butterfly, the air just gets pumped in and fuel is added to give the bang of ignition - this is why dump vlaves dont work on TDs

but with petrol engines they have a butterlfy and when this closes it creates the vac inside the manifold.

and as for the price of the engines, they go for circa 1k. if you keep your eyes peeled you can pick up full cars for that and then break them and make your money back meaning you get the enigne for nothing or as near as

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