Nothing to see here - Kadett MOT work and 9 days to finish..

Pics and specs of cars owned by members (if the thread isn't about your car then please do not post in it!)

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Postby Mantadoc » 16 Oct 2007, 22:05

Sunday

Started about 2pm again :D

Old wheel well, this was actually a temp repair a couple of years ago. I bought one but I always thought is was much shallower than the original. I was tempted to add to this and re-use it but then thought better to start again.

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Bit of jig needs to go temporarily, quite reassuring that nothing popped when it was cut through, nor did it pinch the blade.

I'll put it back in later.

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First rule of spare wheel well club is........try a wheel.

The second rule of spare wheel well club is....of forget it I did that bit already.

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Tape marked on wheel to give me an idea what needs covering.

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Decided to drop the floor plate straight down and weld it to the new rail section rather than turn it out and use it for the bottom of the well too.

The gap in the weld is for drainage if any gets in the rail.

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The other side of the well onto the quarter

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Rough fit of wheel well bottom plate. I thought I would take a leaf out of the Manta book and leave a flange sticking down. I may yet fillet it and cut this off, but we'll see.

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Another view of the same, obviously a lot of trimming to do on the bottom and nearest edge.

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This is pretty much how it will look in side though....

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.............and there is plenty of room for fat rubber if ever needed

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Another 14" pizza.

Notice how I've pimped it out with accessories

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Postby Mantadoc » 20 Oct 2007, 23:12

Fillet welded inside then lost the flange.

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Postby Mantadoc » 22 Oct 2007, 00:36

Sunday

Back to work for a rest tomorrow.

I was dreading this bit, at the end of the exhaust hump, all compound curves. Started off with the flange.

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Flange screwed in and another piece welded to it, third piece in cardboard.

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The finished wotsit.

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All welded in and the exhaust mount added.

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The flange on the right is just to keep the steel rigid.

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Made a mess of this, ran grinder down the crease as bottom and flange was crumbly, worrying about the corner last. Idea is to fillet into the corner but steel too pitted to get totally clean and a bit thin. basically messed it up a bit but didn't want to cut into the side.

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That flange for rigidity being cut away, then it'll be ground back to the weld and hopefully after the corner and spotting the flange that'll be done.

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Postby Mantadoc » 27 Oct 2007, 22:03

No work today, Fiat Strada stops play. What are the odds eh?
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Postby Mantadoc » 29 Oct 2007, 01:09

Sunday bodge day

I ground the weld along the fillet - shouldn't have had to but made a bit of a mess :(

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A hole...... and some button welds on the bottom seam. I like to work to standard seams. I have replaced both sides of this one and it would be less work to lose it, but keeping it means you can fit panels to a known point in the future.

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Close up for no good reason

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Spotted in.

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And done. Not the best.

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Made this plate to close chassis to bottom of wheel well.... and folded each fold the wrong way.

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At least the sky was clear and I got a pic of the stars...... or I had a bright light under the boot floor and these are some of the screw holes I need to weld up.

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Postby Mantadoc » 04 Nov 2007, 23:33

Saturday

So I folded that plate the right way this time and popped it on.

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Nice expanse of shiny steel, oh and that plate

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Sunday

Rear seat belt mount - pristine :D

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I took out a load of inner arch with the seat belt mount section, not because it was rusty that far up but needed to take enough to have good access to weld.

You can see how crunchy the flange it was attached to is / was, yup that's got to go too.

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We have the chassis rail in the boot, the spring hanger underneath. The floor panel is sandwiched in the middle and then comes out and folds down to make the flange the inner arch goes to.

That 3 layer sandwich is all crunchy, so instead of disassembling I cut it off and welded 1.6 plate for rigidity across the rails, sure the floor layer isn't tied in on this outside edge but I think seam welded 1.6mm will more than make up for it. Be a lot better than this crumbly stuff!

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Flange is off and cleaned up to the right of the spring hanger.

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Cold day and needed to smoothrite the nearside wishbones and bumpstop, so stood it in boiling water with the lid loosened for a while, otherwise it can just be too cool to brush easily and too cold to dry quickly.

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There would have been a pic of the bridging plate from hanger to rail but phone went flat :(

Once that is done I need to make a flange to stick out with a 90 degree fold so I have something to attach the inner arch to.

Oh and for good measure the floor is rusty up to the jacking point / axle mount. Axle mount to floor sandwich is swelled too, would probably pass mot for a year or two if painted, but may as well do it while I'm digging deep.

Only working weekends, so that will add a week or 3 to the finish time.

Oh well.
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Postby Mantadoc » 12 Nov 2007, 01:43

Couldn't be bothered yesterday, so big day today, well still had a lie in and put 10 hours in....... time goes nowhere with these jobs does it?


Mmmmmmm shiny

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And bumpstop painted and rubber fitted, really needs the shoulder for a more factory look.

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Good shot of crumbly seam, and you can see some of the turret turned out towards the camera

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Long shot. Turret cut away, edges cleaned, crumbly seam gone. The eagle eyed will spot a scab at the middle top of the pic.

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Plated across the seam.

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Corner built out with flange, this is on the corner of the turret to wheel arch.

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Turret repair has sneaked into the corner of the shot, and the flange has been reconstructed.

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More turret repair and holes for the plugwelds. You might notice a load more arch has gone. The spot welds to the bulkhead had rusted through so rather than a patch above a patch it had to go.

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Finally, the whole turret repair, other wise this is a gratuitous and pointless pic :D

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The repair panel with weld through primered edge

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And this bit finished.

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Close-up of the layers.

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I would have liked to have run the inner arch repair panel all the way to the front in one piece. However, I need to keep clearance to cut out the area above the axle mount. Because the axle mount and jacking point is in one, once this is removed I will need to support under the axle, hence taking the weight on the spring mount and up into the inner arch. That's why I've closed this piece off prematurely.


Fitted new (recon) rack. Well actually I re-fitted the original rack. No-one had racks listed anymore, so Anderw Page in Bury arranged for the original rack to be reconned and shipped back - 2 days turn around. A nice service to know about if you have something unusual. They're pretty helpful there.

Also re-fitted the wishbone, then remembered the new top ball joints were on the floor in my brother-in-laws car. DOH!

I know it doesn't look like much has happened but I have also now stripped the right hand side of the interior, belt carpet etc (nice to find floor underneath mostly) and started removing back seat frame to get at chassis rail.
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Postby Mantadoc » 17 Nov 2007, 21:35

Spring compressor of choice...... The Opel Manta :D This is not a recommended procedure.

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Front suspension back together, just a few bolts to tighten when the weight of the car is on it.

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Meanwhile back at the ranch work continues.

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Same S***, different side.

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The axle mount is shot at, so as I need to get one ordered up, I thought I would get the sill sorted on the left.

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Postby Mantadoc » 19 Nov 2007, 01:01

Back for more punishment? Yep.

The idea here is to lightly take the paint off the old sill flange with the grinder, low spots with paint left on are usually the spot welds.

The spot welds are then gently ground. when it goes nice and blue the steel is hot, but more importantly, usually thin.

The game is to make it thin without going through so........

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With the aid of a screw driver slipped between the two the flange can be popped off as the steel tears around the spot weld like tin foil.

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Leaving the panel behind in good condition, it hasn't been thinned by the grinding and the weld high spots need grinding down and the flange cleaning up for welding.

Of course you can do this with a spot weld cutter if you planned and had one lying around or it was still sharp. I like to avoid the drill type that go straight through, I don't want a hole in the supporting panel, they are fine for salvaging panels if you don't mind holes in the panel you want.

Of course the type of choice are the ones with spring loaded middles. You centre punch the weld then use them in a drill, the middle locates and pushes in and they cut around the weld, but you still have a hole in the top panel, so if you are saving a top panel use them from the other side. If you keep going most will go through both panels. Luckily you usually get a puff of rust dust in the swarf as you get through the top panel.

Hardest thing with the above type is locating the middle of the weld to punch, this is where the grinder is versatile :D but they do beat the grinder in that they don't cause a shower of sparks.

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By this point in the day the cold of the concrete had gotten through the thin soles of the worn out trainers, so I warmed then up at intervals with the hot air gun. Mmmmmmmmmm toasty.

I over did it a bit the last time as when I came to pull my feet out, the inside of the trainers had melted to my socks. Still worth it.

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As you can see the car has had a sill before, well actually a half sill as the fronts were still solid when this was fitted, probably in 2000. The veng sills used were a different fit in the door apature, and about 1cm higher than the ones currently being used, so as the new ones were not high enough on the quarter to go into the same seam I chose to lower them a few cm to avoid having two seams very close together.

A look up the botton of the sill showed that the steel in the apature around the existing seams is still good, barring where the weld burnt it off it still had its primer on inside.

Its generally good practice to use as small a section as is required to get back to good steel so that this situation is avoided. However, the Kadett had had the quarter and arch flat packed by a Rover so I used as much of the arch and sill as possible to remove as much twisted steel as I could.

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The edges have been joggled where possible, the edge setter doesn't do corners but that's life there are ways around this.

For instance where the sill comes out of the door apature onto the quarter I have cut the underlying steel that goes into the door apature in line with the top of the sill. Why? Well a small tap of the hammer lowers the steel beneath so that the corner can now be pushed in flush so that there isn't a step in the door gap when finished. All it will take is a little more care at one point as the very corner to the edge of the black steel going into the apature will be a butt weld.

You can see the dip where the old sill and arch meet, bit poor but seeing as the whole panel was mashed up to the window it was as good as I could do in the alloted time all those years ago.

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The front of the new sill includes the bottom of the A pillar which the previous type of sill I used did not. Of course I didn't fit the front half anyway last time.

While this is handy the shape is incorrect. The bottom seam fits perfectly against the inner sill......

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But the top kicks out. A vee here and there should sort it out. Otherwise the wing won't fit

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That's all for this installment.

Need to find new old trainers :D
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Postby Mantadoc » 10 Dec 2007, 22:01

Door gap is about right without a step in the curve as the underlying skin was cut level, the bump you can see is the weld inside the door shut.

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Door shut, old seam above, new seam below, it's a shame to grind it.

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The poor fit of the front end of the sill

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Welded into the joggled seam, stitched to keep the heat down to limit distortion, not as that matters with the shape of the quarter anyway.

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Next two pics, the seam inside the door shut ground, the fit looks good.

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Next two pics the seam now ground down, if I had made a better job of my tolerances it may have been relatively invisible. as it is the top weld edge is in the joggled step so it's an easy skim over.

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Bad pick, fit is much better than it looks here, it doesn't help that the bottom of the door had been repaired before and the corner sticks out a bit

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Postby Mantadoc » 23 Dec 2007, 20:22

A pic from last week.

This is the front of the sill, it has been drilled uphill and plug welded to attach the internal to the sill at the front.

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Acquired this for £25 today. If only I'd had it a month or two ago it would have got cut down to make a repair to the Kadett rear quarter so it would be less wobbly. Undecided whether to do it or leave it. Anyone want to swap for a coupe rear quarter?

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Postby Mantadoc » 15 Jan 2008, 22:44

Happy new year, getting back to it after a bit of a break.

Spent all day today and only cut 6 pieces of steel and drilled 7 holes. Hmmm.

Can you tell what it is yet folks?

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A bit of the car that probably hasn't been seen in 30 years.

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Plate secured through floor and chassis rail.

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Both plates for front and rear location.

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Basically I don't know if the axle mount will be going back on or be replaced but I need a way to put it back in the same place OR put another one on.

Most importantly the hole for the trailing arm should be back where it was which is what the rest of the jig will do.

The floor between the mount and chassis rail needs to be removed so the flat plates bolt through the chassis rail as that shouldn't move.
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Postby Mantadoc » 16 Jan 2008, 22:19

Another day with lots of work and little progress. It should pay off later though.

The shiny bits are the thin end of the wedge.

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Those two other plates I cut yesterday.

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I like shiny, so another angle for no good reason.

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5 little plates notched to keep a constant 60mm all round.

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Tack welded and removed.

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Same thing, different way up.

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Drilling out spot welds up hill, lots of fun.

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But easier with a pivot and the application of a knee on the other end.

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A quick reminder of why I'm doing this.

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Sandpaper shows up hidden spot welds.

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Kadetts are like parfait. Everyone loves parfait.

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Finally the jacking point / axle mount hits the floor. Needs work, some rust holes. Will have to wait till its cleaned up to see if it is save or replace.

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The floor. Good condition.......not.

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Still the chassis rail isn't too bad at this end. Then again it should be good it's been inside the car for 30 years.

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Postby Mantadoc » 17 Jan 2008, 19:53

Cleaned up the mount. A few obvious problems................

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...............but less obviously the whole piece has suffered thinning.

Notice how the steel appears raised around the trailing arm mounting hole? It isn't raised, everything else has corroded and "lowered".

I've still not decided if to replace or not. If so it's money to buy versus time. To make one I kind of need to make it twice. Easy way is to scribe around the base and cut a piece of steel the same size, then put cardboard inside to template the sides. Clamp to the base plate with some sides inside :? and tack weld through the hole. Remove the mount, seam weld and then build one on the outside to be the replacement. The reason for doing this is the general inaccuracy in folding thick steel with crude equipment so building on the outside of a jig would allow me to get the relationship between foot print and mount holes correct..... but would take a bit of time.

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I hate having numb feet

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The removed flange has an indexing notch, so the new one does too.
It may seem random making this now when there are so many areas to sort before fitting it but...

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......the radiused flange at the bottom of this pic will be cut out when the floor is fixed so this lets me shape this accurately now.

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I would have preferred these two arch plates to be all in one but the necessity of supporting the spring mount to work on the axle mount means it can't be so.

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Postby Mantadoc » 19 Jan 2008, 02:06

First thing, fixed a garage door that's been wonky for 16 years as I know of.

So where was I? Ah yes, rust.

There is a plate I added some years ago when replacing the sill, all crumbly now.

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Cut out the rubbish and sill seems solid enough.

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New corner.

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Sill wire brushed up ok inside. Seems good enough to stay.

3 Skins come together at this side, internal sill support, inner sill and floor. All need making. And the jacking point end sits between two of them to make it easy.

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Anyway, a while ago I fell down stairs and landed on a laptop :D And broke the screen :( So after getting used to resizing the windows to miss out the shattered right hand side I found a bigger screen.

No point fitting it unless you know it works.

Apparently to fit the screen cable (different ends) it would need the top case half off, or I could cut a hole with toe clippers and save 4 hours.

Then once the bigger screen was in the lid I had to trim the bezel out bigger. Those scissors may never be the same.

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Postby Mantadoc » 20 Jan 2008, 23:40

Unpicked spot weld to allow new plate to slide in to repair part of sill strenghening.

The three factory spot welds on the front of the seat support weren't connected!!! Hence screws.

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You can see the plate used above at 2 o'clock to the pizza

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Inner sill repair plate

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Plate in place, plus an extra bit to close the top on the right.

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The original inner sill piece wouldn't have a top. The top piece would be part of the floor panel and the JP brace would be under it. In this case the floor will be welded to the inner, rather than the inner to the floor and the jacking point end will be on top instead of under. Just makes more sense this way. Wish I had done the other side like that too now.

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Allplates screwed into position until everything is made and the fit checked.
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Postby Mantadoc » 31 Jan 2008, 00:18

So the back of the sill. Enough pieces?

Basically I have wimped out and ordered the jacking point bit off Dr Manta (and a couple of door bottoms while I was at it). Basically it would take me a day or two to make a decent jacking point that I was happy with, so spent a couple days wages on bits that will save me some time.

Annoyingly while I was waiting to get bits for other folk my somewhat cheaper suppplier stopped doing the door bottoms. DOH!!!!!

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Spent about 4 hours shaping this out of 2mm steel. How hard can it be to make an 8th of a sphere out of sheet really.

I'm using 2mm on this so it will support the floor piece being hammered against it to get the shape.

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Every now and then I have to have a good sweep up as I hate rolling around in powdered car.

Anyway the Recaro subframes were under the car. These are Manta subframes, the drivers side modified with the mounting tube thingamy of a passenger side one. Otherwise you cannot bolt through both standard Kadett floor mount positions because the Manta one kicks up over a hump in the floor.

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Under floor template with with a piece of steel taped to it.

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And here it is again, scribed through the template with a Stanley

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At last a piece I haven't welded before, the drivers A pillar (had welded the little bracing box section though)

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The car has been in a garage since August, and yet with the sealer off there was moisture behind some of it and the hole looked wet.

Drilled a hole in the bottom and sure enough full of water.

So there you go, in the past I welded the bottom of it and then the top rusts out and all I've achieved is a paddling pool for corrosion that has a munch on the door pillar. Whoopee doo, this job was just too easy without these extra bits :D

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Hole through to the inside by the wing mounting hole. This wasn't apparent with sealer on so looks like it's an inside out job.

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One of those nice numbers stamped in most panels 20 11 6 so that was pressed 20th November 76.

That's just a though for anyone who mixes up bodies while rebuilding cars. These dates are on most panels and easy to see. Also a good check when buying a car.

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The whole pillar....... soon to be gone!

I've tested the thickness with a screw driver and small hammer and it goes through relatively easily so guessing its thin everywhere.

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Off with the thingamy

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And here's what's lurking inside.

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Postby Mantadoc » 31 Jan 2008, 00:29

It's a good job I have some of these in hand. I bought them just in case after the amount of work to make the other passenger pillar up.

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Postby Mantadoc » 01 Feb 2008, 13:55

Thursday

So the door needs to come off to do the pillar, hence I need to disconnect the central locking.

As an aside central locking is dead easy to fit putting it where I have as there is a spare hole in a lever moved by the locking button, it looks like on some markets they may have used a manta style lock / unlock slider.
Of course to use this I needed to reverse how the transducer worked.....

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Which was done, in this case, by reversing the power wires (as determined by looking at slave units)

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And reversing what I take to be the "stop" switch wires. Obviously not the manufacturers recommendation and I wouldn't suggest anyone else do it.

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I've been using these door pins for a while as they are just what the dealer had in one day. Longer than standard and with a flange.

I tend to tap then in the usual way until level with the other side of the hinge so the flange isn't hard against the hinge (5 - 10 mm gap).

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That way I can give them a tap with the hammer to make sure they move and leave enough space for a thick bar, with an 8mm hole drilled in the end which has been opened up into a U shape, to slide behind the head and then tap them out.

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And here is one already out. When it goes well it is so much better.
You may remember the bracket being used to extract the pin from it bracing the nearside chassis rail last year.

Started at 10:30 and by 12 had sorted garage door even more and had the door off. Better than a day for one pin last time.

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Rough fit, you can see how this plate is designed to fit over the box thingy that I have also removed. It's nowhere near perfect but SO much better than having to remove pillar bit by bit while making replacement.

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Really poor fit at the bottom, but decided to replace the full sill now so that will be cut off.

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Skinned pillar....

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Spacing pieces added as with out all the outer skin not much locates the inner and I don't want it, and the hinges, moving around.

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A spare sill front end used for marking purposes. Why couldn't they have made the new panels meet? :(

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No warranty implied or given.
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Postby Mantadoc » 01 Feb 2008, 23:34

Friday

Can someone close the bold tag after Thursday above please (or let me edit the post)

Short day today, 5 hours.

Still cleaning up......

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......and adding spacers

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That horrible bit to go over the inner wing brace willl be going so it can be assembled like the original.

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Nicked and folded flat.

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This gives the correct shape and the hole will be plated up.

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Quick re-assemble with door pins in etc to make sure nothing has moved,

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Top trimmed down as it sat on top originally. That would have raised the wing (bad).

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Top trimmed.

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And tacked.

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Card template to drill upper skin and plug weld through.

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It's not just a case of the plate being a cover, it needs to be attached to the internals too for maximum strength.

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These pattern parts do need work, it's like they were designed to go on top of the original, but way quicker than making repair plates, and even with the extra trimming and messing it's been a big time saver.
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Postby Mantadoc » 06 Feb 2008, 00:56

Bits arrived today from Dr Manta

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These should save a little bit of time.
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Postby Mantadoc » 06 Feb 2008, 01:15

I should point out it is just the jacking point / axle mount and door bottoms that arrived today, the rest have been here a few weeks and are from other sources.
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Postby Mantadoc » 09 Feb 2008, 23:29

Saturday

I measured from the inner wing to the middle of the internal before putting on the outer. A hole drilled in a piece of scrap 2mm forms a jig to let me drill through the outer and part way into the inner to plug weld the two together and avoid drilling into thin air.

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Going in tidily, top pretty much done.

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Old axle mount / jacking point at top, new one at the bottom. Spot the difference.

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Basically they appear to make a universal one, kind of like the outside halves of the left and right joined together. That way the only difference is which side they put the jacking point tube on,

Makes sense and helps economies of scale for people making these kind of parts which can't really be a big seller I would guess.

Doesn't fit in my nice jig due to it being wider, but I can soon cut the flabges to make the required clearance, and most importantly the jig will still put the mounting holes in the right place in relation to the chassis.

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If you recently bought Manta jacking points off me you'll find this funny (ironic?)

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Postby Mantadoc » 11 Feb 2008, 01:08

Sunday

Welded up the back end of the inner sill today in preparation for floor and axle mount / jacking point.

I could have done it a while ago but I was waiting to see what the parts looked like.

It's nice to be able to pull the rear of the sill and the quarter panel not move, especially as the bottom seam isn't welded yet but I wanted this in solid before the sill is cut out.

Lost it a bit on the edge weld on the small top plate but that's life.

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Postby Mantadoc » 16 Feb 2008, 19:16

Treated the welder to some toys, new switches, contact things in the torch and a proper spool thingamy so it carries the 5kg rolls properly.

The temporary measure below is an empty 0.7kg reel cut in half.

Before that I used the handle for a die from a tap and die set.

Oh and a car fuse wedged in the end to stop it springing off.

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Added more to that 2mm bit and welded it in so the rail is quite rigid now.

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Hopefully get this end off the inner arch in tomorrow and if lucky some floor.
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